ABOUT

SPEAKER

CATALOGUE

INFO

CURATOR

OPENING

Contemporary Australian Textiles

18 June – 7 July 2016

Spectrum Project Space Western Australia

+ emotionally evocative + tactile + sculptural + sensory

Background image: Helen Ting, The dark folds of night. Photograph: Keith Friendship

EXHIBITION, JURORS + COMMITTEE

^

twentyONE+, a national juried textile exhibition, celebrates the Western Australian Fibre and Textile Association’s twenty-first anniversary.

Founded in 1995, the Western Australian Fibre and Textile Association (WAFTA), is a dynamic and progressive organisation whose members include both established and emerging artists and therefore represents a diverse range of experiences, needs and artistic practices. Within the membership there is also an increasing crossover between textiles and other mediums – from glass, digital print, digital projection, ceramics and metal through to ephemeral landscape works.

The exhibition brief to the WAFTA community, and more broadly to fibre and textile artists Australia-wide, was to enter work which considered and explored the emotionally evocative, tactile, sculptural and sensory qualities of fibre and textiles.

 Artists were encouraged to push their practice and expand their engagement with the material, aesthetic and conceptual qualities of fibres and textiles, whilst employing high standards of design and craftsmanship. A sympathetic fusion of textiles and other mediums was also encouraged.

The twenty-two artworks selected by the jury explore the brief in diverse ways. Between them, the artists employ a vast array of processes incorporating a combination of traditional, contemporary and experimental techniques or applications reflecting the growing interest and appreciation of textile and fibre art within the broader artistic community.

  • CURATOR'S ESSAY

    Alison Hayles, Arts Professional. June, 2016.

     

    “All young ladies accomplished! My dear Charles, what do you mean?

    “Yes, all of them I think. They all paint tables, cover screens and net purses… I am sure I never heard of a young lady spoken of for the first time, without being informed that she was very accomplished.”

    (Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice)

     

    READ MORE                                                                                                                       X CLOSE

     

     

    As I begin to think and write about this exhibition, I’m sitting in a timber framed house in Kallista in the Dandenong Ranges in Victoria. It’s a cold and rainy day. The damp air seeps up through the floorboards and the sound of two clocks punctuate the passing seconds: slightly out of synch, the second hands competing with each other.

     

    Back in Perth the artwork is yet to be delivered or installed. Indeed, most of it I’ve only seen in photographs. In Kallista there are quilted placemats on the table, I’m wearing a hand-knitted mohair scarf, a machine knitted merino sweater and my felted wool coat sits on a woven rattan chair in the corner. And I think about the rhythm of stitches. I think about the makers and the making. The techniques, processes, and practice. Each of these objects represents an established technique, whether hand or machine, which has a certain rhythm, repetition, which in turn echoes the ritualized patterns and rhythms of life. These objects and garments represent the functional roots of textile art and yet they are not art. They are things which must lose their utility before they’re considered art.

     

    They also speak of the traditional association of textile and craft objects with the home and with women’s work. As the quote from Pride and Prejudice indicates, Regency women who were skilled in the decorative arts were highly regarded. Needlework and embroidery techniques such as whitework were popular pastimes, but aside from this so-called ‘fancy work’, the more practical application of sewing clothing, ‘plain work’, was essential to the running of the household. Interestingly, what came to be regarded as a legitimate occupation for women within the home was, outside of the domestic sphere, largely the domain of men. The making of textiles such as tapestries in factories and workshops in Europe was dominated by men as far back as Early Modern and Medieval times. I reflect on the fact that this exhibition certainly doesn’t challenge the feminisation of textiles, with all the selected artists being women and many of the works being explorations and meditations on domestic themes, but simply reflects the reality that most artists who work with textiles are women.

     

    I was curious when asked to curate the Western Australian Fibre and Textile Association’s (WAFTA) exhibition. I don’t have a background in fibre or textile art. Heck, I don’t even knit. I can only recall working on one exhibition in an established gallery featuring anything close to it, the fact is that most art museums and galleries have traditionally privileged painting, drawing and sculpture over other mediums. (I use the term curate here loosely. As a juried exhibition, beyond the initial selection process, it essentially became about exhibition design: laying out the space, a search for themes, and attempts to find links between seemingly disparate works, through colour, medium, scale, form etc).

     

    The need to categorise art and the world of objects, which is central to traditional museological and curatorial practice, has lead to popular and professional definitions of the boundaries between art and craft practice and objects. As such, in addition to the gendering of craft practice, we have come to associate craft with a particular group of materials – wood, metal, glass, textiles, ceramics etc – and their associated techniques and methodologies.  Much has been written about the relatively recent emergence in 1960s and 70s of fibre and textiles from the cloistered world of craft into the realm of ‘high’ or ‘fine art’. And 50 years later this struggle seems to be echoed in WAFTA’s attempt to reshape and redefine itself within what it sees as the world of contemporary art.

     

    The focus of the exhibition brief for me, demonstrates a concern with the notion of the contemporary within the context of textile art, and textiles within the context of contemporary art. Textile art, as a result of its craft-based origins, concerns the process of making and the connection between the materials and technologies/techniques and the maker. It can involve the fabrication of a textile, the decoration, embellishment, coloration or treatment of a textile, or the assemblage of an existing textile. More recent contemporary practice also seeks to develop ideas through the interaction between the materials and the techniques and technologies associated with them. Here artists were asked to “to push their practice and expand their engagement with the material, aesthetic and conceptual qualities of fibres and textiles, whilst employing high standards of design and craftsmanship”. Furthermore a sympathetic fusion of textiles and other mediums was also encouraged. Consequently, during the selection process, the submission of artworks which were too close to traditional handcraft techniques and forms were rejected in favour of those seen to employ more ‘contemporary’ techniques.

     

    This convergence of mediums serves to dissolve categories of art practice, reflecting certain ideas about contemporary art practice, where artists are no longer defined by the medium in which they work, but by simply being an artist. This idea is can be seen in Annie Shelley and Alana McVeigh’s Threads of Porcelain, which in the gallery space is set upon a plinth made from a worn concrete paver. Here porcelain entombs a piece of crochet, in effect memorialising a crochet blanket. Perhaps this suggests the death of the textile, echoing the numerous pronouncements and ongoing debate in the art world about the so-called ‘death of painting’. Similarly, Marianne Penberthy’s work on corrugated iron In the Meantime, merely makes reference to textiles through what she calls “implied patchwork” and “implied textile”. Kate Weedon-Jones’ Red Centre Vision uses a variety of techniques including painting, stenciling, dyeing and screen printing on a cotton support. For me this points to a slippage between what is considered textile art and what is a painting. Can a painting by virtue of being on canvas also be considered a textile?

     

    Contemporary textile practice is often about appropriating traditional handcrafting techniques for non-traditional or even subversive purposes. This practice and work therefore carries with it a certain self-consciousness or awareness of its origins and reflects the focus of much contemporary textile practice, which is an attempt to create distance between itself and its craft/utilitarian origins whilst simultaneously referring back to its own history. This creates a slightly uncomfortable relationship to the past as it carries with it the burden and blessing of its heritage.

     

    Zoe Barry’s untitled diptych uses cotton hand-stitching and collage on paper, embracing traditional embroidery whilst dispensing with the traditional embroidery textile support. Whilst Jan Mullen’s Feathering the nest #2: death of the doily, depicts the obsolescence of the table cloth or doily, after it was replaced by the easy-clean surfaces like Laminex. Here oval-shaped laminate samples are attached to a vintage square of embroidered linen.  Objects which were made by hand have become relics of the past, and like contemporary textile practice, this work reflects the move away from producing objects of decorative utility or ‘fancy work’.

     

    So I’m left with the question of where and how this exhibition and the textile works it represents fit into the concept of contemporary art? And how do they attempt to negotiate the established hierarchy of art and craft? Seeking to situate new work in materials traditional to craft within the realm of contemporary art is problematic.  Without defining what it means to be contemporary or interrogating the art vs craft and high art vs low art constructs, one effectively gives acknowledgement and legitimacy to the very model which has historically subjugated and resisted textile art and practice. The challenge for WAFTA as it seeks to define its future, and textile artists generally, is how to grapple with these questions.

     

     

    ^

^

  • SPEAKER'S NOTES

     

    Dr Ann Schilo, School of Design & Art, Curtin University. June, 2016.

     

    I wish to acknowledge the Noongar people the traditional custodians of this land on which we meet. My respect to their elders and ancestors.

    I also note today is national arts action day. As arts supporters you, no doubt,  are aware that funding for the arts is as much an important political issue as building yet another sports stadium.

     

    READ MORE                                                                                                                               X CLOSE

    It is a privilege and a pleasure to be invited to open the 21st anniversary exhibition of the Western Australian Fibre and Textiles Association and to be here this evening to celebrate not only their achievements but also their continued importance in the local, national and international art scene for the development and expansion of contemporary textile arts. As you look around the gallery you can see the evidence of their commitment to advancing both the technical expertise of the practice and its creative evolution. My congratulations to all the artists, practitioners and members of the Association.

    When I look around the room I notice all of us are already implicated in the world of textiles and its practices. Quite obviously we are wearing clothes made of the stuff. They are a connecting thread between our selves and the world about us. Whether these garments are bought off the rack in a high-end fashion house, from an op shop, designer bespoke or home-made, they are implicated in meanings about who we are, how we see ourselves and the way others look and respond to us. In some way these clothes are our calling card in the social world. It is this aspect of textiles as a connection between the personal and the communal, that I wish to consider here.

    At the risk of sounding like a sermon delivered by the local church pastor, I will take as my text the following quote from Carole Hunt, who says that textiles 'have the capacity, - if not unique then unusually powerful – to embody both a communal, historical moment and a local individual specific story' (Hunt, 2014: 226). Thus in the context of this evening's exhibition we are looking at moment in the communal history of both this organisation and, more generally, Western Australian art practices, and also the individual stories of not only each artist but also ourselves as audience members, as in consort we create the work. While Hunt's essay is a very scholarly one into the meanings of worn clothes and textiles as an archive of memory, it is her consideration of the connections between the self and the outer world, as well as her assertion that textiles 'communicate meaning through properties other than the purely visual' (226) that provides the basis for my address.

    These works are a locus, a pivotal point between the artist and the social cultural world. They are art within what Rosalind Krauss calls an 'expanded field' (Krauss: 1986), that is they are not restricted to conventional definitions of textile production, nor standard formulae about art, but rather incorporate materials, practices, methods and ideas from a myriad of sources. They range from what we might call 'traditional' in those everyday understandings such as plain sewing, stitching, embroidery, quilting and so forth, yet also involve experimental, contemporary forms that engage in multi-disciplinary approaches and practices. So for example in Family Tree, Margaret Ford uses numerous familiar domestic art techniques, crochet, embroidery, knotting, yet she extends the concept of a family lineage within a Western Australian location through her use of local dyes and the motif of indigenous flora. Similarly at first glance a number of artists, for example, Janie Matthews, Jan Mullen, and Marianne Penberthy reference patchwork and quilt making practices, and Helen Ting's work might be seen as just another example of weaving, however all these works actively expand on traditional practices through the incorporation of new materials, methods, and ideas to present very contemporary forms.

    Certainly all these works enter into the space of the art gallery through their shift from attending solely to the pragmatics of practice; the physical properties of fabric and fibre, the sensitivity to its textures, drape, durability and so forth, or to technical expertise, those highly valued skills and crafting we all can appreciate. Instead the artists extend their work into a rich and varied fertile conceptual ground. On one level this can be seen as an investigation into processes, materials, fabrication, where the acts involved in making, and the passage of time taken to create, are critically analyzed and foregrounded, for example:  in Jody Quackenbush's homage to her great grand-mother Ivy; or in Alana McVeigh's and Annie Shelley's juxtaposition of crochet lace making with porcelain. There are numerous other examples here where the artists have been inspired by the actualities of textile production, which in turn inform the visual and sensate experience of the work.

    On another level the idea that inspired the artist, the specific story she wishes to tell, is envisaged through the materials at hand, for example: in the bricolage of Trudi Pollard's personal reflection on her childhood practice of cubby making; in Katrina Virgona's sculptural variations on a hat pin for Emmeline Pankhurst; in the evocative stitched and dyed blanket strips of Glenys Mann's poignant political comment on the safe transit of children; or in the perverse humour of Zoe Barry's stitchery on images from popular culture.

    Importantly, these works allow us to reflect upon and see our world anew, not through the restricted purity of vision - the traditional discerning eye that views art - but through an understanding drawn from our lives which are immersed in material and sensate experiences. Although these works are hung in a gallery, complete with those institutional prohibitions about not touching the valuable Art, we are able – informed by the very material substance, the stuff of the everyday, the clothes, the domestic interiors, the fabric of our daily lives – to transcend that so called purity of vision. This is an aesthetic appreciation that is grown from intimate and embodied knowing.

    I mentioned at the start of this address that textiles provide a bridge between the self and the communal. These artworks before you are such a connection. They offer a meeting place between the ideas of the artist and her deftness with the materials, which she uses to fabricate her story, and our own understandings, which we bring with us when we reflect on the work. I hope this exhibition gives you as much pleasure and insight into our contemporary social cultural world as it has given me.

    Again my congratulations to the artists for such fine, well-considered work. Happy 21st birthday to the Western Australian Fibre and Textiles Association; may your future endeavours be as rewarding as those exhibited here.

     

    Dr Ann Schilo, School of Design & Art, Curtin University. June, 2016.

    References:

    Hunt, Carole. 2014 'Worn clothes and textiles as archives of memory' in Critical Studies in Fashion and Beauty
    vol 5 No. 2
    .

    Krauss, Rosalind. 1986 The Originality of the Avant-Garde and Other Modernist Myths Cambridge: MIT Press.

     

    ^

^

Artist Statement

I started my ‘making life’ afresh in January 2015 with the aim of exploring a totally self-centred approach to designing and making. Setting a ‘back to base’ approach was needed after many years of working commercially in the Quilt Industry, then teaching locally in my studio, and most recently initiating and coordinating Salvage Selvedge – a large Community project.

The starting theme for this reset was the Black Swan.

Whilst seeming quite specific, the thought lines that project out from this bird/this symbol are many. As I researched and recorded ideas, the theme fortuitously became a link to many of my other interests….

I collect ‘stuff’.

This mostly lowbrow ‘stuff’- much of which is probably of paltry value to anyone else – is an invaluable resource collection. I have accumulated this visual library because I understood, deep down, that it could be valuable to me in the future, that it would help to tell my story via ‘the stories/ the stuff’ that I am interested in.

I am not limited by either my research or my starting points.

I am drawing from my history and my background and the good things that bubble up from my happy life.

I am interested in home. In family.

In history.

In connections.

I did not think that I would be delving into the bird world but the Black Swan, the avian emblem of Western Australia, holds a big appeal. To the girl brought up in suburban Melbourne with a Black Sheep in the back yard and who, years ago, made sculptures from washed up penguins, this reveals a certain symmetry?

I started with the Black Swan but other local birds now also catch my attention as I walk locally and as we tend the garden at our family weekender down south.

Birds, feathers, and nests offer me a new language, a way that I can move through the theme of family and home with fresher visuals and with personal connections.

I cannot discount other themes creeping to the fore or intersecting.…as I write this on a wintery-looking day, the clouds scoot across the sky, framed and intersected by power lines. I quickly take some photos though I already have hundreds of these snaps – of clouds and of power lines.

I come from a quilt-making working life – even though I majored in sculpture and art based textiles. Quilt making has given me much, but of late it is the simple repetition of stitch and of line – not tied to layering – that I turn to.

As I am slowly returning to drawing. As I am returning to thinking in 3D.

My making/my work is now very simply a conduit and a connection from past to future, and as such enhances of my life.

Born 1951 in Perth, Western Australia but spending the greater part of my life in Melbourne and Canberra, I returned to Perth in 2006.

 

ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS

Bachelor of Science (Monash), Gradate Diploma in Administration (University of Canberra), Diploma of Human Resources (Canberra Institute of Technology), Graduate Certificate in Pharmacy Entry (Murdoch), Master of Arts, Pharmacy (UWA -part only).

 

Career history

Now retired, I had a thirty-year career in public administration, culminating in senior executive positions in the Commonwealth Government and at The Australian National University. On the side (necessarily as time was limited) I was a member of several textile groups, serving on management committees and having work in their joint exhibitions.

 

TEXTILE BACKGROUND

In 2012, after many years of “playing” and the accumulation of a lot of techniques as well as the ubiquitous large stash, I resolved to have a go at producing some real textile art: to make it the focus of my days rather than a marginal activity. I have no formal art training but lots of great friends and fellow members of textile organisations such as WAFTA, WAQA, SAQA, FeltWEST, the SDA, Ozquilt, The Hand spinners’, Weavers and Dyers’ Guild, etc., to be inspired and advised by.

 

Favourite techniques

After spending years acquiring patchwork and quilting skills with the associated challenges of design and use of colour, I attended several workshops with Prudence Mapstone. Possibly as an early warning of senility, I rediscovered my crochet and knitting skills as a seven year old. Suddenly I saw clearly the potential of these mediums for the making of three-dimensional work and for the use of existing skills like hand-stitching and natural and other dyeing.

 

Exhibitions

I participated in the WAFTA exhibitions Naturally, In-Tension, Mysterium and Memory & Commemoration between 2009 and 2015. All of these pieces were layered fabric two-dimensional works, which used hand-dyed materials. I also entered works into the two exhibitions of the Designing Women (WA) group: Dimensions in 2012 and Seams and Layers 2014. Both works in the latter two shows were three-dimensional, fabric based, naturally dyed pieces. ‘Leaf Litter’, the work from the Seams and Layers exhibition, was subsequently shown as part of an exhibition at the Forest Heritage Centre in Dwellingup.

 

MELD

In 2014 I had work in the exhibition Hidden Revealed Transformed, a joint showing of work at the Showcase Gallery in Perth by four friends identifying as the MELD group. It was there for the first time that I included three-dimensional crocheted work in addition to stitched pieces.

While Hidden Revealed Transformed was a successful exhibition and gave me a bit more confidence,

Benjamin Disraeli’s saying “Success is the Child of Audacity” rings true still. Entering twentyONE+ was an act of incredible audacity, and, incredibly, my work ‘Family Tree’ was selected!

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

Since leaving university in 1996 I have exhibited both nationally and internationally in a range of media. While I work primarily in textiles I do not limit my practice to one medium, I use whichever media or technique will best realise my ideas.

In general terms, my work is focused on concepts of fragility, temporality, history and memory. I aim to reflect these ideas in the language of fabric, thread and stitch.

I am interested in the historical place of textiles, the relationship of cloth to the body and the traditions associated with making.

I find the keeping and treasuring of old, used, objects, particularly cloth, fascinating. Because ideas and memories are often inconsistent and fleeting, their meaning is also constantly shifting and changing.

Usually, I find the action of hand stitching quite meditative, the choice of stitch or the colour of thread used is not always pre-determined. While I have an overall idea of the direction a piece will take, I allow the work to ‘speak’ and guide my hand. The obvious investment of time needed to create a hand-stitched piece is in itself part of the work.

 

Education and Qualifications199819981995 Selected Exhibitions20152014201220112010201020082004200420032003200120002000200020001999Certificate in Museum Studies (Distinction), Edith Cowan University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art) (Honours – First Class), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art) (Distinction), Curtin University, WA, AUS  Expressions: The Wool Quilt Prize, National Wool Museum, VIC, AUSStitched and Bound, Heathcote Art Gallery, WA, AUSMine Own Executioner, Mundaring Arts Centre, WA, AUSLove Lace, Powerhouse Museum, NSW, AUSExpressions 2010, Wool Quilt Award, National Wool Museum, VIC, AUSEmbroidery with Wool Exhibition, Embroiderers’ Guild of Victoria, VIC, AUSExpressions 2008, Wool Quilt Award, National Wool Museum, VIC, AUSExpressions 2004, Wool Quilt Award, National Wool Museum, VIC, AUSAustralian Quilts in Germany, Manheim, GERMANYPojagi and Beyond, Waco, Texas, USA2nd International Lace for Fashion Award, Powerhouse Museum, NSW, AUSQuilt National ‘01, Dairy Barn Cultural Arts Centre, Ohio, USA, (Touring Exhibition).City of Perth Craft Award, Craftwest Gallery, WA, AUS, (Touring Exhibition).Kimono Show, Gallery East, WA, AUSMiniature Works, Textiles from Western Australia, Gallery Gallery, Kyoto, JAPANfolding, An Exchange Exhibition of Works in Fibre, Itami Museum of Arts and Crafts, Kyoto, JAPANShibori in Contemporary Art, Museo Nacional de BellasArtes, Santiago, CHILE

 

Artist Statement

My work is often inspired by our untold or hidden stories, the ones we keep close to our hearts. I am fascinated by the contrast and often conflicts between these stories and the person we see. Only through enquiry do we discover the complexity of the journey people have travelled.

I use a variety of techniques such as screen printing, stamping, block printing, shibori, hand dyeing and transfer printing to create pattern and texture on silk and cotton fabrics, usually in bold and vibrant colours. Sections, blocks and repetition are frequently used to represent time, recurring themes, and events in our lives. I use raw, cut and frayed edges to create texture. References to Chenilling, Patchwork and Bojagi can often be seen in my work.

I am currently in the process of further exploring and developing layering and revealing techniques to create more textural and multi-dimensional works.

 

This Work: ‘Behind the Diagnosis’

This series of work began in response to my frustrating experience applying for a disability support pension for my 16 year old son who has Down Syndrome, which involved an arduous series of steps over 5 months, through a system which is incompetent and lacking in compassion. This made me more determined to fight for recognition of him as a human being.

The basis of the work is the Karyotype of the Chromosomes; the scanned image of this shown to me at his birth, I kept going back to in my mind. (A set of the 23 chromosome pairs are laid out in numerical order. If there are three instead of two pairs of number 21 chromosome, this leads to a diagnosis of Trisomy 21 – Down Syndrome).

I was inspired by karyotype images where striped diagrams of black and white lines appear in pairs of varying set lengths. I first made a standard Down Syndrome Karyotype cut from my jeans, and my husband’s business shirts, then sets with discarded upholstery fabric samples. The beauty, high contrast and the delicacy of each layer helped me to see the complexity, uniqueness and personality rather than the cold clinical profile. The process assisted my healing. These individual chromosomes were then threaded onto wire and coiled basket-like, looped and woven to show a cheeky personality, a passion for life, hopes and dreams, all the truly human aspects of the person, rather than just a clinical profile.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Louise Wells completed a 5 year Specialist Art program at Balcatta SHS, and then gained an Associate Diploma in Textiles at Western Australian Institute of Technology (now Curtin University) in 1983. This was followed by a traineeship with Kate Weedon-Jones at Fremantle Arts Centre, majoring in the production of repeat design screen printed lengths. At this time Louise, along with six other recent WAIT graduates, set up a group studio space (Northfolk Studios) in North Perth. Here she started designing and selling her own range of clothing and screen printed items.

Louise exhibited in several group exhibitions, culminating in a solo exhibition in Albany, WA in 1987. She also taught textiles to both adults and children in various school and community programs during this time. Later she worked in an Occupational Therapy outpatient clinic where she taught a variety of Arts, Crafts and Life Skills programs.

A long break from a full-time textile practice to raise her 3 children allowed Louise to learn and explore many areas of textile interest for pure enjoyment. Her current textile practice reflects this development and life experience. Over the past seven years she has exhibited in 25 group exhibitions (seven jury selected), along with completing a year long self-directed colour project in 2012 as part of her ongoing education.

Biography

Marianne Penberthy is an established West Australian fibre and textile artist based in Geraldton, whose work gives organic expression to her natural surroundings.

Marianne was born in Queensland, and moved to Western Australia in the early 1970s where she became a self taught studio potter. Later she studied Art and Design at Durack College Geraldton. In 1995 she gained a BA (Visual Arts) from Edith Cowan University in Perth.

A transition toward textiles was marked by a return to her known childhood landscape in Queensland which refreshed her deeper memories of home. Homeground, a joint exhibition with her sister Kerry Johns in the Caloundra Regional Gallery embraced textiles, mixed media and installation.

An interest in Asian textiles, traditions and methods has led to invitations to participate in international textile exhibitions including the Textile Exchange Project in Hyogo, Japan and the Bojagi & Beyond Exhibitions in Seoul Korea and San Francisco USA. In 2014 Marianne was invited to attend the Korean Bojagi Forum where she showed new works in a solo exhibition on Jeju Island South Korea. This project was funded by the WA Department of Culture & Arts and the City of Greater Geraldton.

Recently her focus has been to find new ways to incorporate textiles within the landscape. These investigations build on earlier ground installations where she used ropes to stitch the land. Her willingness to uncover her sense of connection to Australian landscapes comes with a desire to patch, stitch, mend and dust the ground. Textiles offer her a way to practice being present in her chosen landscapes.

Education1995 Professional Experience2015/14/13201420131996 Cross Cultural Public Art Commission2006  Exhibitions: Solo20142013200620042001  Exhibitions: International2014201220112011 Exhibitions: Juried2016201520152015/1320142012 Exhibitions: Two/Three Persons20032000 Award Exhibitions201420132012 Prizes and Awards2015201420132012 Grants2014  2013 Bachelor of Arts [Visual Arts] Edith Cowan University, WA, AUS  Zest Festival Kalbarri, Ideas Development, Assist Installation of Art Spaces, WA, AUSForum Lecture 2014 Korean Bojagi Forum Jeju, SOUTH KOREATextile engagement workshops Northampton Aboriginal Community, WA, AUSLecturer Coordinator Aboriginal Art & Design Midwest College, WA, AUS  Dept Housing and Works Perth WA Entry Foyer Geraldton Regional HospitalPenberthy/Papertalk-Green Cultural Indigenous Collaborative Commission, WA, AUS  Bojagi & Beyond, Nori Gallery Jeoji Artist’s Village, Jeju, SOUTH KOREARecall: An Artist’s Journey, ACDC Community Gallery, WA, AUSRekindling, Goldsmiths Hall, WA, AUSReturning, Project Gallery, WA, AUSHomeground, Project Gallery, Geraldton Regional Art Gallery, WA, AUS   Bojagi & Beyond, International Quilt Exhibition Chojun, Art Museum, Seoul, KOREAInternational Bojagi & Beyond, Seoul, KOREATextile Exchange Project Re: A Prefix, Hyogo Museum, JAPAN & Perth Museum, WA, AUSInternational Bojagi & Beyond, Folk Art Centre, San Francisco, USA  Fiberarts International 2016, Pittsburg Center for the Arts, Pennsylvania, USATasmanian Art Quilt Prize, Narryna Heritage Museum, TAS, AUSMaterialities, SDA Exhibition, Arrowmont, USABunbury Biennale, Bunbury Regional Art Gallery, WA, AUSPetite Miniature Textiles, Wangaratta Regional Gallery, VIC, AUSExpressions 2012: Wool Quilt Prize, VIC, AUS  Returning, Caloundra Qld Regional Art Gallery, QLD, AUSHomeground, Collaborative with Kerry Johns, Caloundra Regional Gallery, QLD, AUS  Port Hedland Art Award, Courthouse Gallery, WA, AUSMidwest Art Prize, Geraldton Regional Art Gallery, WA, AUSGreat Southern Art Award, WA, AUS  Materialities, Arrowmont School of Art/Craft Tennessee SDA Exhibition 2nd Place, USAPort Hedland Art Awards, Best Non Indigenous, WA, AUSPort Hedland Art Award, (Most Outstanding Work), WA, AUSMidwest Art Prize, (Highly Commended Mid West Award), WA, AUS  WA Department of Culture & Arts New Work Development GrantWA Department of Culture & Arts Art FlightCity of Greater Geraldton Artist Grant to attend Korean Bojagi ForumCity of Greater Geraldton Artist Grant

 

 

 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

My art practice explores the barely visible, small, human stories of history. Many exist only in memory, in oral telling, in fabrics, objects and in the presence of old, hand-written letters. Such stories are fragmented as they are handed down in time, and when we re-create them again in our own words.I am currently exploring the idea of being in a foreign land, the way of seeing another culture and the representation of a world that is exotic. I am interested in the way the traveller interprets and represents the light, the people, the imagery and the motifs of the countries they find themselves in.I employ various assemblage and machine embroidery techniques to create textile installations. I use dyeing, solvent transfer and devore and often combine them with drawing and handwriting. I prefer to use found fabrics, papers and threads with a history of their own and allow these to help tell the story. Curriculum VitaeDoctor of Philosophy candidate, University of Western Australia, WA, AUS Education20162010200819851981–83 Awards201520152015201420112008 CollectionsTelethon Institute of Child Health, WA, AUSDoctor of Philosophy candidate, University of Western Australia, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art), Honours with First Class, Curtin University, WA, AUSGraduate Diploma of Visual Art, (Distinction), Curtin University, WA, AUSDiploma of Education Murdoch University, VIC, AUSBachelor of Arts, University of Melbourne, VIC, AUS  Australian Post Graduate Award ScholarshipUWA Safety-Net Top-Up ScholarshipTarling-Hetherington Scholarship, UWAJudge’s Commendation, Mandurah Wearable Art Stretch FestivalFiona Stanley Telethon Adventurer’s AwardStudio Academic Achievement Award for Graduate Diploma in Art, Curtin University

 

 

 

 

Education and Experience

20162015201520142012–20142011–Present2011–20122011201020102010 ExhibitionsSolo Exhibitions2014 Group Exhibitions201520132013201320132013201220122011201120112011201020102009200920092009 Commissions2012 Curatorial20132011 Awards201120062005Consultant, Fitzgerald Photo ImagingArt Technician, Balcatta Senior High SchoolAssistant to the Curator/Editor, the Artist’s ChronicleRetail Assistant, Jacksons Drawing SuppliesAssistant Administration Officer, Art on the the MoveCasual Exhibition Installation, variousMembership Coordinator, ArtsourceCertificate in Arts ManagementGraduate in residence, Curtin UniversityCuratorial Internship, Exhibition Installation, Reception, Fremantle Arts CentreGraduated Bachelor of Arts (Art), Curtin University   Hypnopompic Phenomena, Peek-a-boo Gallery, WA, AUS  Studio Artists Exhibition, Tresillian Arts Centre, WA, AUSFrig it’s Cold, Peek-a-boo Gallery, WA, AUSBright Lights, Small City, Buratti Fine Art Gallery, WA, AUSGrow Your Own Sketchbook, Propel Youth Arts, various venues, toured WA, AUSUnconscious ARTiculation, Melody Smith Art Gallery, WA, AUSBurnie Print Prize 2013, finalist, Burnie Arts and Function Centre, TAS, AUSPrint Association of Western Australia Members Exhibition, Atwell Gallery, WA, AUSCompact Prints, Umbrella Studio, QLD, AUSMake Friend VII, Norfolk Basement, WA, AUSColosoul Art Exhibition and Auction, Wilkinson Gallery, WA, AUSPort Jackson Press Australia Graduate Printmaking Award, James Makin Gallery, VIC, AUSBSG Small Works, Brunswick Street gallery, VIC, AUSARTillery’s Masterpeace, Manhattans Bar, WA, AUSWorks on Paper 2010, Brunswick Street Gallery, VIC, AUSCurtin Degree Show, Department of Art, Curtin University, WA, AUS20x20, Print Exchange Program Exhibition, Think Tank Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUS30x30, Fundraiser Exhibition, Tangent Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUSTote Bag, Fundraiser Exhibition, Tangent Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUS  Angove Street Festival 2012, City of Vincent, WA, AUS  Unconscious ARTiculation, Melody Smith Art Gallery, WA, AUSKick the Habit, Free Range Gallery, WA, AUS  Winner of 3D category, Victoria Park Art Awards 2011Winner of Youth Health Art Prize, Great Southern Division of General Practice NetworkBest Water-Colour Painting: Cuballing Art and Flowers Festival

 

Alana McVeigh

ARTIST STATEMENT

My work examines simplicity of form, translucency, a sense of stillness and an enquiry into aesthetics. Working with the material (porcelain) has become the catalyst for my practice; it is a time where a type of understanding begins; the point where my investigation is initiated and streams of research are identified, and where the fluid mental engagement is realized through the material.

Fusing the influences of minimalist design principles and Western philosophical discourse, and the ubiquitous markings left behind by time. The wheel thrown forms carry the textured patterns and the subtle imprints caught between the flow of the natural world.

 Doctor of Philosophy candidate (Current), Curtin University, WA, AUSMaster of Arts (Art) (Distinction), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts, Honours (Art) (1st Class), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art), Curtin University, WA, AUSAdvanced Diploma of Art & Design, Perth Central TAFE, WA, AUSDiploma of Art, West Coast College of TAFE, WA, AUSAdvanced Certificate, Art & Design, West Coast College of TAFE, WA, AUSCertificate 1V Art, West Coast College of TAFE, WA, AUSCertificate Art & Design, North Metro College of TAFE, WA, AUS  Lecturer & Supervisor, Master of Applied Art & Design, Curtin University, WA, AUSTutor, Fremantle Arts Centre, WA, AUSSessional Academic, Curtin Open University, WA, AUSLecturer Honours/Masters, Curtin University, WA, AUSTutor/Teacher (ceramics), SODA Studios, WA, AUSTutor (seminar program), Curtin University, WA, AUSLecturer (ceramics), Curtin University, WA, AUSTutor/Teacher (Art), Kalamunda Senior High School, WA, AUSTutor/Teacher, Tresillian Centre, WA, AUSTeacher, Clay Play Pty LTD, WA, AUS  Guest speaker ScanCeram, Tolne, (Scandinavian Ceramic Conference), DENMARKCatalogue essay A Presentation of Time, Canada, ISBN 978-1-927516-04-1Director Harry & Harriet Australia, WA, AUSGuest lecturer Shaw Centre Medicine Hat, Alberta, CANGuest speaker Red Deer College, Alberta, CANInvited Speaker 2009 International Masters Workshop, Jingdezn, CHINInvited Speaker Australian Ceramics Triennale, University of Sydney, NSW, AUSInvited Speaker Ceramics Arts Association WA, Edith Cowan University, WA, AUSInvited Speaker Verge National Ceramic Conference, Conference Centre, QLD, AUSDemonstrator- Large scale ceramic forms, Verge National Ceramic Conference, QLD, AUSResearch Assistant, 3 Elements Exhibition, Australian Embassy, Tokyo, JAPANAcademic Qualifications201120082006200420022001200019991996 Teaching Experience2014–current20142010–current2010–20112009–20112009–current2007–200920072004–20072004–2006 Professional Experience201320132012–1420122012200920092006200620062002 Annie ShelleyArtist StatementMy art practice explores the barely visible, small, human stories of history. Many exist only in memory, in oral telling, in fabrics, objects and in the presence of old, hand-written letters. Such stories are fragmented as they are handed down in time, and when we re-create them again in our own words.I am currently exploring the idea of being in a foreign land, the way of seeing another culture and the representation of a world that is exotic. I am interested in the way the traveller interprets and represents the light, the people, the imagery and the motifs of the countries they find themselves in.I employ various assemblage and machine embroidery techniques to create textile installations. I use dyeing, solvent transfer and devore and often combine them with drawing and handwriting. I prefer to use found fabrics, papers and threads with a history of their own and allow these to help tell the story. Curriculum VitaeDoctor of Philosophy candidate, University of Western Australia, WA, AUS Education20162010200819851981–83 Awards201520152015201420112008 CollectionsTelethon Institute of Child Health, WA, AUSDoctor of Philosophy candidate, University of Western Australia, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art), Honours with First Class, Curtin University, WA, AUSGraduate Diploma of Visual Art, (Distinction), Curtin University, WA, AUSDiploma of Education Murdoch University, VIC, AUSBachelor of Arts, University of Melbourne, VIC, AUS  Australian Post Graduate Award ScholarshipUWA Safety-Net Top-Up ScholarshipTarling-Hetherington Scholarship, UWAJudge’s Commendation, Mandurah Wearable Art Stretch FestivalFiona Stanley Telethon Adventurer’s AwardStudio Academic Achievement Award for Graduate Diploma in Art, Curtin University

 

 

 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

My practice privileges intimate handmade objects that are quiet, unheroic and made with time consuming skill.

 PhD Candidate School of Communications and Arts, Edith Cowan University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Indigenous Australian Cultural Studies)(1st Class Honours), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Science (Geology), UWA, WA, AUS  Bellwether FundingNAVA Australian Artists GrantWAFTA scholarship to FibreswestAustralian Postgraduate Award (APA) and an Edith Cowan University Merit AwardRoyalties for Regions, Marlu Kuru Kuru women’s art project,infrastructure and business trainingGuild On ShowMarlu Kuru Kuru Feb 12 – April, 3 Access Gallery in the John Curtin Gallery, WA, AUS  field working slow making, Spectrum Project Space, Edith Cowan University, WA, AUSDirect Address, NSW, AUS15 x 15, Fibreswest, WA, AUSMemory and Commemoration, WAFTA group show, Perth Convention Centre, WA, AUSInspired by Nalda, The Painted Tree Gallery, WA, AUSMysterium, WAFTA Members Biennale Exhibition, WA, AUSFingers and Petals, Ellenbrook Arts, WA, AUSWestern Australian Photographic Book Showcase, PCP, WA, AUSsmART, John Curtin Gallery, WA, AUSCurtin Degree Show, WA, AUSBody Mapping, Genesis in the Hills Restaurant, WA, AUSStuff of Art, Curtin University, WA, AUS30 x 30, Tangent Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUS30 x 30 (2), Tangent Gallery Curtin University, WA, AUSSilent Auction, Tangent Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUS  field working slow making, Spectrum Project Space (co curator), WA, AUSMarlu Kuru Kuru, (curator), Genesis in the Hills Restaurant, WA, AUSMarlu Kuru Kuru, (curator), Genesis in the Hills Restaurant, WA, AUSMarlu Kuru Kuru, (curator), John Curtin Gallery, WA, AUS  Educational QualificationsOngoing self-taught stitch, fibre techniques2014–present2009–2010 2006–20081984–1986 Grants and scholarships2016201620152014–20172009–201020082009

Group Exhibitions (selected)201620162015201520142013201320122010200820082008200820082008 Curated Exhibitions2016201220102009 CollectionsJohn Curtin Gallery CollectionA number of Private Collections 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Statement

I started my ‘making life’ afresh in January 2015 with the aim of exploring a totally self-centred approach to designing and making. Setting a ‘back to base’ approach was needed after many years of working commercially in the Quilt Industry, then teaching locally in my studio, and most recently initiating and coordinating Salvage Selvedge – a large Community project.

The starting theme for this reset was the Black Swan.

Whilst seeming quite specific, the thought lines that project out from this bird/this symbol are many. As I researched and recorded ideas, the theme fortuitously became a link to many of my other interests….

I collect ‘stuff’.

This mostly lowbrow ‘stuff’- much of which is probably of paltry value to anyone else – is an invaluable resource collection. I have accumulated this visual library because I understood, deep down, that it could be valuable to me in the future, that it would help to tell my story via ‘the stories/ the stuff’ that I am interested in.

I am not limited by either my research or my starting points.

I am drawing from my history and my background and the good things that bubble up from my happy life.

I am interested in home. In family.

In history.

In connections.

I did not think that I would be delving into the bird world but the Black Swan, the avian emblem of Western Australia, holds a big appeal. To the girl brought up in suburban Melbourne with a Black Sheep in the back yard and who, years ago, made sculptures from washed up penguins, this reveals a certain symmetry?

I started with the Black Swan but other local birds now also catch my attention as I walk locally and as we tend the garden at our family weekender down south.

Birds, feathers, and nests offer me a new language, a way that I can move through the theme of family and home with fresher visuals and with personal connections.

I cannot discount other themes creeping to the fore or intersecting.…as I write this on a wintery-looking day, the clouds scoot across the sky, framed and intersected by power lines. I quickly take some photos though I already have hundreds of these snaps – of clouds and of power lines.

I come from a quilt-making working life – even though I majored in sculpture and art based textiles. Quilt making has given me much, but of late it is the simple repetition of stitch and of line – not tied to layering – that I turn to.

As I am slowly returning to drawing. As I am returning to thinking in 3D.

My making/my work is now very simply a conduit and a connection from past to future, and as such enhances of my life.

Education and Experience

20162015201520142012–20142011–Present2011–20122011201020102010 ExhibitionsSolo Exhibitions2014 Group Exhibitions201520132013201320132013201220122011201120112011201020102009200920092009 Commissions2012 Curatorial20132011 Awards201120062005Consultant, Fitzgerald Photo ImagingArt Technician, Balcatta Senior High SchoolAssistant to the Curator/Editor, the Artist’s ChronicleRetail Assistant, Jacksons Drawing SuppliesAssistant Administration Officer, Art on the the MoveCasual Exhibition Installation, variousMembership Coordinator, ArtsourceCertificate in Arts ManagementGraduate in residence, Curtin UniversityCuratorial Internship, Exhibition Installation, Reception, Fremantle Arts CentreGraduated Bachelor of Arts (Art), Curtin University   Hypnopompic Phenomena, Peek-a-boo Gallery, WA, AUS  Studio Artists Exhibition, Tresillian Arts Centre, WA, AUSFrig it’s Cold, Peek-a-boo Gallery, WA, AUSBright Lights, Small City, Buratti Fine Art Gallery, WA, AUSGrow Your Own Sketchbook, Propel Youth Arts, various venues, toured WA, AUSUnconscious ARTiculation, Melody Smith Art Gallery, WA, AUSBurnie Print Prize 2013, finalist, Burnie Arts and Function Centre, TAS, AUSPrint Association of Western Australia Members Exhibition, Atwell Gallery, WA, AUSCompact Prints, Umbrella Studio, QLD, AUSMake Friend VII, Norfolk Basement, WA, AUSColosoul Art Exhibition and Auction, Wilkinson Gallery, WA, AUSPort Jackson Press Australia Graduate Printmaking Award, James Makin Gallery, VIC, AUSBSG Small Works, Brunswick Street gallery, VIC, AUSARTillery’s Masterpeace, Manhattans Bar, WA, AUSWorks on Paper 2010, Brunswick Street Gallery, VIC, AUSCurtin Degree Show, Department of Art, Curtin University, WA, AUS20x20, Print Exchange Program Exhibition, Think Tank Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUS30x30, Fundraiser Exhibition, Tangent Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUSTote Bag, Fundraiser Exhibition, Tangent Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUS  Angove Street Festival 2012, City of Vincent, WA, AUS  Unconscious ARTiculation, Melody Smith Art Gallery, WA, AUSKick the Habit, Free Range Gallery, WA, AUS  Winner of 3D category, Victoria Park Art Awards 2011Winner of Youth Health Art Prize, Great Southern Division of General Practice NetworkBest Water-Colour Painting: Cuballing Art and Flowers Festival

 

Born 1951 in Perth, Western Australia but spending the greater part of my life in Melbourne and Canberra, I returned to Perth in 2006.

 

ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS

Bachelor of Science (Monash), Gradate Diploma in Administration (University of Canberra), Diploma of Human Resources (Canberra Institute of Technology), Graduate Certificate in Pharmacy Entry (Murdoch), Master of Arts, Pharmacy (UWA -part only).

 

Career history

Now retired, I had a thirty-year career in public administration, culminating in senior executive positions in the Commonwealth Government and at The Australian National University. On the side (necessarily as time was limited) I was a member of several textile groups, serving on management committees and having work in their joint exhibitions.

 

TEXTILE BACKGROUND

In 2012, after many years of “playing” and the accumulation of a lot of techniques as well as the ubiquitous large stash, I resolved to have a go at producing some real textile art: to make it the focus of my days rather than a marginal activity. I have no formal art training but lots of great friends and fellow members of textile organisations such as WAFTA, WAQA, SAQA, FeltWEST, the SDA, Ozquilt, The Hand spinners’, Weavers and Dyers’ Guild, etc., to be inspired and advised by.

 

Favourite techniques

After spending years acquiring patchwork and quilting skills with the associated challenges of design and use of colour, I attended several workshops with Prudence Mapstone. Possibly as an early warning of senility, I rediscovered my crochet and knitting skills as a seven year old. Suddenly I saw clearly the potential of these mediums for the making of three-dimensional work and for the use of existing skills like hand-stitching and natural and other dyeing.

 

Exhibitions

I participated in the WAFTA exhibitions Naturally, In-Tension, Mysterium and Memory & Commemoration between 2009 and 2015. All of these pieces were layered fabric two-dimensional works, which used hand-dyed materials. I also entered works into the two exhibitions of the Designing Women (WA) group: Dimensions in 2012 and Seams and Layers 2014. Both works in the latter two shows were three-dimensional, fabric based, naturally dyed pieces. ‘Leaf Litter’, the work from the Seams and Layers exhibition, was subsequently shown as part of an exhibition at the Forest Heritage Centre in Dwellingup.

 

MELD

In 2014 I had work in the exhibition Hidden Revealed Transformed, a joint showing of work at the Showcase Gallery in Perth by four friends identifying as the MELD group. It was there for the first time that I included three-dimensional crocheted work in addition to stitched pieces.

While Hidden Revealed Transformed was a successful exhibition and gave me a bit more confidence,

Benjamin Disraeli’s saying “Success is the Child of Audacity” rings true still. Entering twentyONE+ was an act of incredible audacity, and, incredibly, my work ‘Family Tree’ was selected!

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

Since leaving university in 1996 I have exhibited both nationally and internationally in a range of media. While I work primarily in textiles I do not limit my practice to one medium, I use whichever media or technique will best realise my ideas.

In general terms, my work is focused on concepts of fragility, temporality, history and memory. I aim to reflect these ideas in the language of fabric, thread and stitch.

I am interested in the historical place of textiles, the relationship of cloth to the body and the traditions associated with making.

I find the keeping and treasuring of old, used, objects, particularly cloth, fascinating. Because ideas and memories are often inconsistent and fleeting, their meaning is also constantly shifting and changing.

Usually, I find the action of hand stitching quite meditative, the choice of stitch or the colour of thread used is not always pre-determined. While I have an overall idea of the direction a piece will take, I allow the work to ‘speak’ and guide my hand. The obvious investment of time needed to create a hand-stitched piece is in itself part of the work.

 

Education and Qualifications199819981995 Selected Exhibitions20152014201220112010201020082004200420032003200120002000200020001999Certificate in Museum Studies (Distinction), Edith Cowan University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art) (Honours – First Class), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art) (Distinction), Curtin University, WA, AUS  Expressions: The Wool Quilt Prize, National Wool Museum, VIC, AUSStitched and Bound, Heathcote Art Gallery, WA, AUSMine Own Executioner, Mundaring Arts Centre, WA, AUSLove Lace, Powerhouse Museum, NSW, AUSExpressions 2010, Wool Quilt Award, National Wool Museum, VIC, AUSEmbroidery with Wool Exhibition, Embroiderers’ Guild of Victoria, VIC, AUSExpressions 2008, Wool Quilt Award, National Wool Museum, VIC, AUSExpressions 2004, Wool Quilt Award, National Wool Museum, VIC, AUSAustralian Quilts in Germany, Manheim, GERMANYPojagi and Beyond, Waco, Texas, USA2nd International Lace for Fashion Award, Powerhouse Museum, NSW, AUSQuilt National ‘01, Dairy Barn Cultural Arts Centre, Ohio, USA, (Touring Exhibition).City of Perth Craft Award, Craftwest Gallery, WA, AUS, (Touring Exhibition).Kimono Show, Gallery East, WA, AUSMiniature Works, Textiles from Western Australia, Gallery Gallery, Kyoto, JAPANfolding, An Exchange Exhibition of Works in Fibre, Itami Museum of Arts and Crafts, Kyoto, JAPANShibori in Contemporary Art, Museo Nacional de BellasArtes, Santiago, CHILE

 

Alana McVeigh

ARTIST STATEMENT

My work examines simplicity of form, translucency, a sense of stillness and an enquiry into aesthetics. Working with the material (porcelain) has become the catalyst for my practice; it is a time where a type of understanding begins; the point where my investigation is initiated and streams of research are identified, and where the fluid mental engagement is realized through the material.

Fusing the influences of minimalist design principles and Western philosophical discourse, and the ubiquitous markings left behind by time. The wheel thrown forms carry the textured patterns and the subtle imprints caught between the flow of the natural world.

 Doctor of Philosophy candidate (Current), Curtin University, WA, AUSMaster of Arts (Art) (Distinction), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts, Honours (Art) (1st Class), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art), Curtin University, WA, AUSAdvanced Diploma of Art & Design, Perth Central TAFE, WA, AUSDiploma of Art, West Coast College of TAFE, WA, AUSAdvanced Certificate, Art & Design, West Coast College of TAFE, WA, AUSCertificate 1V Art, West Coast College of TAFE, WA, AUSCertificate Art & Design, North Metro College of TAFE, WA, AUS  Lecturer & Supervisor, Master of Applied Art & Design, Curtin University, WA, AUSTutor, Fremantle Arts Centre, WA, AUSSessional Academic, Curtin Open University, WA, AUSLecturer Honours/Masters, Curtin University, WA, AUSTutor/Teacher (ceramics), SODA Studios, WA, AUSTutor (seminar program), Curtin University, WA, AUSLecturer (ceramics), Curtin University, WA, AUSTutor/Teacher (Art), Kalamunda Senior High School, WA, AUSTutor/Teacher, Tresillian Centre, WA, AUSTeacher, Clay Play Pty LTD, WA, AUS  Guest speaker ScanCeram, Tolne, (Scandinavian Ceramic Conference), DENMARKCatalogue essay A Presentation of Time, Canada, ISBN 978-1-927516-04-1Director Harry & Harriet Australia, WA, AUSGuest lecturer Shaw Centre Medicine Hat, Alberta, CANGuest speaker Red Deer College, Alberta, CANInvited Speaker 2009 International Masters Workshop, Jingdezn, CHINInvited Speaker Australian Ceramics Triennale, University of Sydney, NSW, AUSInvited Speaker Ceramics Arts Association WA, Edith Cowan University, WA, AUSInvited Speaker Verge National Ceramic Conference, Conference Centre, QLD, AUSDemonstrator- Large scale ceramic forms, Verge National Ceramic Conference, QLD, AUSResearch Assistant, 3 Elements Exhibition, Australian Embassy, Tokyo, JAPANAcademic Qualifications201120082006200420022001200019991996 Teaching Experience2014–current20142010–current2010–20112009–20112009–current2007–200920072004–20072004–2006 Professional Experience201320132012–1420122012200920092006200620062002 Annie ShelleyArtist StatementMy art practice explores the barely visible, small, human stories of history. Many exist only in memory, in oral telling, in fabrics, objects and in the presence of old, hand-written letters. Such stories are fragmented as they are handed down in time, and when we re-create them again in our own words.I am currently exploring the idea of being in a foreign land, the way of seeing another culture and the representation of a world that is exotic. I am interested in the way the traveller interprets and represents the light, the people, the imagery and the motifs of the countries they find themselves in.I employ various assemblage and machine embroidery techniques to create textile installations. I use dyeing, solvent transfer and devore and often combine them with drawing and handwriting. I prefer to use found fabrics, papers and threads with a history of their own and allow these to help tell the story. Curriculum VitaeDoctor of Philosophy candidate, University of Western Australia, WA, AUS Education20162010200819851981–83 Awards201520152015201420112008 CollectionsTelethon Institute of Child Health, WA, AUSDoctor of Philosophy candidate, University of Western Australia, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art), Honours with First Class, Curtin University, WA, AUSGraduate Diploma of Visual Art, (Distinction), Curtin University, WA, AUSDiploma of Education Murdoch University, VIC, AUSBachelor of Arts, University of Melbourne, VIC, AUS  Australian Post Graduate Award ScholarshipUWA Safety-Net Top-Up ScholarshipTarling-Hetherington Scholarship, UWAJudge’s Commendation, Mandurah Wearable Art Stretch FestivalFiona Stanley Telethon Adventurer’s AwardStudio Academic Achievement Award for Graduate Diploma in Art, Curtin University

 

 

 

 

Artist Statement

I started my ‘making life’ afresh in January 2015 with the aim of exploring a totally self-centred approach to designing and making. Setting a ‘back to base’ approach was needed after many years of working commercially in the Quilt Industry, then teaching locally in my studio, and most recently initiating and coordinating Salvage Selvedge – a large Community project.

The starting theme for this reset was the Black Swan.

Whilst seeming quite specific, the thought lines that project out from this bird/this symbol are many. As I researched and recorded ideas, the theme fortuitously became a link to many of my other interests….

I collect ‘stuff’.

This mostly lowbrow ‘stuff’- much of which is probably of paltry value to anyone else – is an invaluable resource collection. I have accumulated this visual library because I understood, deep down, that it could be valuable to me in the future, that it would help to tell my story via ‘the stories/ the stuff’ that I am interested in.

I am not limited by either my research or my starting points.

I am drawing from my history and my background and the good things that bubble up from my happy life.

I am interested in home. In family.

In history.

In connections.

I did not think that I would be delving into the bird world but the Black Swan, the avian emblem of Western Australia, holds a big appeal. To the girl brought up in suburban Melbourne with a Black Sheep in the back yard and who, years ago, made sculptures from washed up penguins, this reveals a certain symmetry?

I started with the Black Swan but other local birds now also catch my attention as I walk locally and as we tend the garden at our family weekender down south.

Birds, feathers, and nests offer me a new language, a way that I can move through the theme of family and home with fresher visuals and with personal connections.

I cannot discount other themes creeping to the fore or intersecting.…as I write this on a wintery-looking day, the clouds scoot across the sky, framed and intersected by power lines. I quickly take some photos though I already have hundreds of these snaps – of clouds and of power lines.

I come from a quilt-making working life – even though I majored in sculpture and art based textiles. Quilt making has given me much, but of late it is the simple repetition of stitch and of line – not tied to layering – that I turn to.

As I am slowly returning to drawing. As I am returning to thinking in 3D.

My making/my work is now very simply a conduit and a connection from past to future, and as such enhances of my life.

Artist Statement

I started my ‘making life’ afresh in January 2015 with the aim of exploring a totally self-centred approach to designing and making. Setting a ‘back to base’ approach was needed after many years of working commercially in the Quilt Industry, then teaching locally in my studio, and most recently initiating and coordinating Salvage Selvedge – a large Community project.

The starting theme for this reset was the Black Swan.

Whilst seeming quite specific, the thought lines that project out from this bird/this symbol are many. As I researched and recorded ideas, the theme fortuitously became a link to many of my other interests….

I collect ‘stuff’.

This mostly lowbrow ‘stuff’- much of which is probably of paltry value to anyone else – is an invaluable resource collection. I have accumulated this visual library because I understood, deep down, that it could be valuable to me in the future, that it would help to tell my story via ‘the stories/ the stuff’ that I am interested in.

I am not limited by either my research or my starting points.

I am drawing from my history and my background and the good things that bubble up from my happy life.

I am interested in home. In family.

In history.

In connections.

I did not think that I would be delving into the bird world but the Black Swan, the avian emblem of Western Australia, holds a big appeal. To the girl brought up in suburban Melbourne with a Black Sheep in the back yard and who, years ago, made sculptures from washed up penguins, this reveals a certain symmetry?

I started with the Black Swan but other local birds now also catch my attention as I walk locally and as we tend the garden at our family weekender down south.

Birds, feathers, and nests offer me a new language, a way that I can move through the theme of family and home with fresher visuals and with personal connections.

I cannot discount other themes creeping to the fore or intersecting.…as I write this on a wintery-looking day, the clouds scoot across the sky, framed and intersected by power lines. I quickly take some photos though I already have hundreds of these snaps – of clouds and of power lines.

I come from a quilt-making working life – even though I majored in sculpture and art based textiles. Quilt making has given me much, but of late it is the simple repetition of stitch and of line – not tied to layering – that I turn to.

As I am slowly returning to drawing. As I am returning to thinking in 3D.

My making/my work is now very simply a conduit and a connection from past to future, and as such enhances of my life.

Biography

Marianne Penberthy is an established West Australian fibre and textile artist based in Geraldton, whose work gives organic expression to her natural surroundings.

Marianne was born in Queensland, and moved to Western Australia in the early 1970s where she became a self taught studio potter. Later she studied Art and Design at Durack College Geraldton. In 1995 she gained a BA (Visual Arts) from Edith Cowan University in Perth.

A transition toward textiles was marked by a return to her known childhood landscape in Queensland which refreshed her deeper memories of home. Homeground, a joint exhibition with her sister Kerry Johns in the Caloundra Regional Gallery embraced textiles, mixed media and installation.

An interest in Asian textiles, traditions and methods has led to invitations to participate in international textile exhibitions including the Textile Exchange Project in Hyogo, Japan and the Bojagi & Beyond Exhibitions in Seoul Korea and San Francisco USA. In 2014 Marianne was invited to attend the Korean Bojagi Forum where she showed new works in a solo exhibition on Jeju Island South Korea. This project was funded by the WA Department of Culture & Arts and the City of Greater Geraldton.

Recently her focus has been to find new ways to incorporate textiles within the landscape. These investigations build on earlier ground installations where she used ropes to stitch the land. Her willingness to uncover her sense of connection to Australian landscapes comes with a desire to patch, stitch, mend and dust the ground. Textiles offer her a way to practice being present in her chosen landscapes.

Education1995 Professional Experience2015/14/13201420131996 Cross Cultural Public Art Commission2006  Exhibitions: Solo20142013200620042001  Exhibitions: International2014201220112011 Exhibitions: Juried2016201520152015/1320142012 Exhibitions: Two/Three Persons20032000 Award Exhibitions201420132012 Prizes and Awards2015201420132012 Grants2014  2013 Bachelor of Arts [Visual Arts] Edith Cowan University, WA, AUS  Zest Festival Kalbarri, Ideas Development, Assist Installation of Art Spaces, WA, AUSForum Lecture 2014 Korean Bojagi Forum Jeju, SOUTH KOREATextile engagement workshops Northampton Aboriginal Community, WA, AUSLecturer Coordinator Aboriginal Art & Design Midwest College, WA, AUS  Dept Housing and Works Perth WA Entry Foyer Geraldton Regional HospitalPenberthy/Papertalk-Green Cultural Indigenous Collaborative Commission, WA, AUS  Bojagi & Beyond, Nori Gallery Jeoji Artist’s Village, Jeju, SOUTH KOREARecall: An Artist’s Journey, ACDC Community Gallery, WA, AUSRekindling, Goldsmiths Hall, WA, AUSReturning, Project Gallery, WA, AUSHomeground, Project Gallery, Geraldton Regional Art Gallery, WA, AUS   Bojagi & Beyond, International Quilt Exhibition Chojun, Art Museum, Seoul, KOREAInternational Bojagi & Beyond, Seoul, KOREATextile Exchange Project Re: A Prefix, Hyogo Museum, JAPAN & Perth Museum, WA, AUSInternational Bojagi & Beyond, Folk Art Centre, San Francisco, USA  Fiberarts International 2016, Pittsburg Center for the Arts, Pennsylvania, USATasmanian Art Quilt Prize, Narryna Heritage Museum, TAS, AUSMaterialities, SDA Exhibition, Arrowmont, USABunbury Biennale, Bunbury Regional Art Gallery, WA, AUSPetite Miniature Textiles, Wangaratta Regional Gallery, VIC, AUSExpressions 2012: Wool Quilt Prize, VIC, AUS  Returning, Caloundra Qld Regional Art Gallery, QLD, AUSHomeground, Collaborative with Kerry Johns, Caloundra Regional Gallery, QLD, AUS  Port Hedland Art Award, Courthouse Gallery, WA, AUSMidwest Art Prize, Geraldton Regional Art Gallery, WA, AUSGreat Southern Art Award, WA, AUS  Materialities, Arrowmont School of Art/Craft Tennessee SDA Exhibition 2nd Place, USAPort Hedland Art Awards, Best Non Indigenous, WA, AUSPort Hedland Art Award, (Most Outstanding Work), WA, AUSMidwest Art Prize, (Highly Commended Mid West Award), WA, AUS  WA Department of Culture & Arts New Work Development GrantWA Department of Culture & Arts Art FlightCity of Greater Geraldton Artist Grant to attend Korean Bojagi ForumCity of Greater Geraldton Artist Grant

 

 

 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

My art practice explores the barely visible, small, human stories of history. Many exist only in memory, in oral telling, in fabrics, objects and in the presence of old, hand-written letters. Such stories are fragmented as they are handed down in time, and when we re-create them again in our own words.I am currently exploring the idea of being in a foreign land, the way of seeing another culture and the representation of a world that is exotic. I am interested in the way the traveller interprets and represents the light, the people, the imagery and the motifs of the countries they find themselves in.I employ various assemblage and machine embroidery techniques to create textile installations. I use dyeing, solvent transfer and devore and often combine them with drawing and handwriting. I prefer to use found fabrics, papers and threads with a history of their own and allow these to help tell the story. Curriculum VitaeDoctor of Philosophy candidate, University of Western Australia, WA, AUS Education20162010200819851981–83 Awards201520152015201420112008 CollectionsTelethon Institute of Child Health, WA, AUSDoctor of Philosophy candidate, University of Western Australia, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art), Honours with First Class, Curtin University, WA, AUSGraduate Diploma of Visual Art, (Distinction), Curtin University, WA, AUSDiploma of Education Murdoch University, VIC, AUSBachelor of Arts, University of Melbourne, VIC, AUS  Australian Post Graduate Award ScholarshipUWA Safety-Net Top-Up ScholarshipTarling-Hetherington Scholarship, UWAJudge’s Commendation, Mandurah Wearable Art Stretch FestivalFiona Stanley Telethon Adventurer’s AwardStudio Academic Achievement Award for Graduate Diploma in Art, Curtin University

 

 

 

 

Artist Statement

My work is often inspired by our untold or hidden stories, the ones we keep close to our hearts. I am fascinated by the contrast and often conflicts between these stories and the person we see. Only through enquiry do we discover the complexity of the journey people have travelled.

I use a variety of techniques such as screen printing, stamping, block printing, shibori, hand dyeing and transfer printing to create pattern and texture on silk and cotton fabrics, usually in bold and vibrant colours. Sections, blocks and repetition are frequently used to represent time, recurring themes, and events in our lives. I use raw, cut and frayed edges to create texture. References to Chenilling, Patchwork and Bojagi can often be seen in my work.

I am currently in the process of further exploring and developing layering and revealing techniques to create more textural and multi-dimensional works.

 

This Work: ‘Behind the Diagnosis’

This series of work began in response to my frustrating experience applying for a disability support pension for my 16 year old son who has Down Syndrome, which involved an arduous series of steps over 5 months, through a system which is incompetent and lacking in compassion. This made me more determined to fight for recognition of him as a human being.

The basis of the work is the Karyotype of the Chromosomes; the scanned image of this shown to me at his birth, I kept going back to in my mind. (A set of the 23 chromosome pairs are laid out in numerical order. If there are three instead of two pairs of number 21 chromosome, this leads to a diagnosis of Trisomy 21 – Down Syndrome).

I was inspired by karyotype images where striped diagrams of black and white lines appear in pairs of varying set lengths. I first made a standard Down Syndrome Karyotype cut from my jeans, and my husband’s business shirts, then sets with discarded upholstery fabric samples. The beauty, high contrast and the delicacy of each layer helped me to see the complexity, uniqueness and personality rather than the cold clinical profile. The process assisted my healing. These individual chromosomes were then threaded onto wire and coiled basket-like, looped and woven to show a cheeky personality, a passion for life, hopes and dreams, all the truly human aspects of the person, rather than just a clinical profile.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Louise Wells completed a 5 year Specialist Art program at Balcatta SHS, and then gained an Associate Diploma in Textiles at Western Australian Institute of Technology (now Curtin University) in 1983. This was followed by a traineeship with Kate Weedon-Jones at Fremantle Arts Centre, majoring in the production of repeat design screen printed lengths. At this time Louise, along with six other recent WAIT graduates, set up a group studio space (Northfolk Studios) in North Perth. Here she started designing and selling her own range of clothing and screen printed items.

Louise exhibited in several group exhibitions, culminating in a solo exhibition in Albany, WA in 1987. She also taught textiles to both adults and children in various school and community programs during this time. Later she worked in an Occupational Therapy outpatient clinic where she taught a variety of Arts, Crafts and Life Skills programs.

A long break from a full-time textile practice to raise her 3 children allowed Louise to learn and explore many areas of textile interest for pure enjoyment. Her current textile practice reflects this development and life experience. Over the past seven years she has exhibited in 25 group exhibitions (seven jury selected), along with completing a year long self-directed colour project in 2012 as part of her ongoing education.

ARTIST STATEMENT

My practice privileges intimate handmade objects that are quiet, unheroic and made with time consuming skill.

 PhD Candidate School of Communications and Arts, Edith Cowan University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Indigenous Australian Cultural Studies)(1st Class Honours), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Arts (Art), Curtin University, WA, AUSBachelor of Science (Geology), UWA, WA, AUS  Bellwether FundingNAVA Australian Artists GrantWAFTA scholarship to FibreswestAustralian Postgraduate Award (APA) and an Edith Cowan University Merit AwardRoyalties for Regions, Marlu Kuru Kuru women’s art project,infrastructure and business trainingGuild On ShowMarlu Kuru Kuru Feb 12 – April, 3 Access Gallery in the John Curtin Gallery, WA, AUS  field working slow making, Spectrum Project Space, Edith Cowan University, WA, AUSDirect Address, NSW, AUS15 x 15, Fibreswest, WA, AUSMemory and Commemoration, WAFTA group show, Perth Convention Centre, WA, AUSInspired by Nalda, The Painted Tree Gallery, WA, AUSMysterium, WAFTA Members Biennale Exhibition, WA, AUSFingers and Petals, Ellenbrook Arts, WA, AUSWestern Australian Photographic Book Showcase, PCP, WA, AUSsmART, John Curtin Gallery, WA, AUSCurtin Degree Show, WA, AUSBody Mapping, Genesis in the Hills Restaurant, WA, AUSStuff of Art, Curtin University, WA, AUS30 x 30, Tangent Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUS30 x 30 (2), Tangent Gallery Curtin University, WA, AUSSilent Auction, Tangent Gallery, Curtin University, WA, AUS  field working slow making, Spectrum Project Space (co curator), WA, AUSMarlu Kuru Kuru, (curator), Genesis in the Hills Restaurant, WA, AUSMarlu Kuru Kuru, (curator), Genesis in the Hills Restaurant, WA, AUSMarlu Kuru Kuru, (curator), John Curtin Gallery, WA, AUS  Educational QualificationsOngoing self-taught stitch, fibre techniques2014–present2009–2010 2006–20081984–1986 Grants and scholarships2016201620152014–20172009–201020082009

Group Exhibitions (selected)201620162015201520142013201320122010200820082008200820082008 Curated Exhibitions2016201220102009 CollectionsJohn Curtin Gallery CollectionA number of Private Collections 

 

 

 

 

 

THE OPENING

 

^

Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+
Opening night Wafta twentyONE+

EXHIBITION INFO

^

18 June – 7 July 2016

Spectrum Project Space

Edith Cowan University, 2 Bradford Street, Mount Lawley

Western Australia, 6050

 

Opening hours:

Tuesday to Friday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Saturday 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Closed Mondays and Sundays

 

 

Artist talks

Saturday 25 June 2pm

& Wednesday 29 June 1pm

CATALOGUE

Download our 80 page full colour catalogue here. It includes the Curator's and Opening Speaker's essays plus double page spreads displaying each artists exhibition pieces and their full biographies.

Download and save to your desktop.

 

Approx 5 mg

DOWNLOAD

 NOW

^

PROUDLY SUPPORTED BY: